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Boat Details

About This Boat

She is unlike any other catamaran. She is simple. She is smart. She is old-school cool. I call her my Northwest Interpretation of a Polynesian Voyaging Canoe. I first came across her in early 2000 when anchored in Sequim Bay. She was moored in a protected cove incomplete and never rigged. As I dinghied around her I thought to myself, “That is going to be a sweet catamaran when she is finished - what a cool project.” In 2005 she became my project and I and sentenced myself and a good buddy to 3 Summers of hard boatyard labor and then some great Northwest sailing. . .


Additional Details

History & Specifications

She looks a bit like a Wharram. Indeed, the designer of her hulls (a Mr. Beaubien whom I've never met) had built a 47' Wharram in California in the late 1970s and sailed it for 3 years on the Pacific before selling and determining that he could do better. He did better. He designed very elegant chined hulls that greet the water with ironwood shoed, curved overhanging bows having tremendous reserve buoyancy. He designed elongated transoms that kiss the water goodbye as the last of the 1/2” thick transom-hung rudder departs. These hulls are 54' long overall and hew to the wisdom that there is no substitute for waterline at sea. They are chined to yield ample living space below yet sleek, sleek, sleek. So sleek that she is easily driven at 8.5 knots by her single Isuzu 50 hp diesel. So sleek that she easily achieves 13 knots under sail with 20 knots on the beam. She barely even leaves a wake. Sleek and incredibly durable. She has 15' long mini-keels made of sacrificial laminated cedar with an ironwood shoe and massive skegs protecting her rudders. She will easily stand on her keels and skegs and draws only 3.5'. Her hulls have their stringers on end and filleted in place for strength. Stems are nearly 1 foot thick behind their ironwood cladding. Each hull has a large watertight bow compartment followed by amidships accommodations and then another watertight bulkhead with engine room and head trailing - making 6 watertight compartments overall in the hulls. Her hulls are constructed of epoxy saturated marine plywood (from ¾” to 3/8”) which was then sheathed in fiberglass and West Systems epoxy. Stringers and structural lumber is clear, tight-grained, fir, spruce, and cedar carefully selected from the Olympic forests and supplemented by tropical mahogany, teak, and ironwood. I have never found a knot on her. Her bilges are dry and dusty.

Mr. Beaubien built himself a set of hulls and his friend Mr. Farnell, a cabinetmaker and very good with wood, built a set of hulls as well. Beaubien launched his hulls in the early 1980s. He reportedly joined them with 6 crossbeams entrapping a triple-junk rig and headed North. I hear he is somewhere in Northern BC. I've never been able to find him to tell him that he designed a damn fine set of hulls. Mr. Farnell completed these hulls soon after and, after consultation with multihull designer John Marples, joined them with 4 massive fiberglass-sheathed epoxy-laminated fir box-beams with 3 1/2” top and bottom faces and 1 1/2” side faces plus internal blocking. Each of the 4 box beams are mechanically fastened to the hulls in 4 places using custom brackets and large bronze threaded rod and bolts. The beams are further buttressed on the topsides by large laminated solid mahogany knees and then glassed to the decks and topped with UHMW running boards to prevent damage from chains, lines, or deck gear on top. Each beam is watertight and adds significantly to reserve buoyancy. Everything is prevented from racking by a series of spruce longerons that run beneath the beams and act as the bridgedeck supports.  The longerons carry the bridgedeck more than 3' off of the water (you can drive the dinghy straight beneath and scrub the entirety of the hulls and running gear). A central steering cockpit with a hard dodger is nested amidships.  The cockpit is surrounded by slatted fir removable panels fixed with Amsteel line that make up a strong deck that drains instantly. Mr. Farnell launched the unrigged vessel in 1990 in Port Angeles, WA after more than 10,000 hours of labor and motored her across the Straits a few times before unexpectedly and indefinitely postponing his South Pacific Cruising plans in favor of raising a newly arrived son.

At this point you probably realize this is a broker-owned and broker-loved boat. I bought her from Mr. Farnell in 2005, motored her to Port Townsend and then put another 3,000 man hours and considerable expense into completing her. The first Summer she was stripped to bare wood and/or fiberglass sheathing and inspected throughout before receiving seemingly unending sanding and then 2 layers of 2-part polyurethane primer and 5 layers of rolled and tipped 2-part polyurethane Interlux Perfection topcoat on her hulls. Her decks were 2-part polyurethane primed and then painted with Top-Secret epoxy paints.

That Winter I hired John Marples (now a well respected designer of ply-epoxy cruising and day charter catamarans) to design a rig for her. Even though she is 54' long, I wanted a rig that could be handled easily and simply by a smaller person than myself so John drew a traditional Marconi Ketch rig. You don't see many ketch catamarans, but the rig is an excellent choice for an open-bridge-deck cat. You never need to get within 10' of the water to manage the sails. The mizzen mast is mounted on an aluminum I-beam tressle slung on stainless straps between crossbeams 3 and 4 directly behind the cockpit. The main mast is landed on the 2nd crossbeam ahead of the cockpit. Sails are hoisted from clear decks amidships and all running rigging can be put to the winch either at the mast winches or turned and run to the big Lewmar 65 primary winches in the cockpit. She is very easy to single-hand as all sheets for all 3 sails are right at the helmsman's fingertips in the cockpit. This rigging wizardry was accomplished by Mr. Brion Toss who was hired to install the brand new spars and their standing and running rigging in the Summer of 2006. That Winter Carol Hasse built her a brand new fully-battened mainsail with Strongtrack luff and double reef points and refitted a near-new fully-battened mizzen sail from an Aileron 28' that had only been used for a season's racing. She also added a 130% furling genoa making for a well balanced sail plan that is a delight to sail and beautiful to behold. Sea trials were held with Mr. Farnell aboard on the Strait of Juan de Fuca in the Spring of 2007.

This is a big, simple, strong, and easy-to-maintain and repair catamaran in every respect. Aesthetically, she is more like owning a pair of co-joined Hans Christians than a plastic-fantastic production cat. Simple epoxy, painting, woodworking and mechanical skills are all that are required to keep her in great shape at low expense. You can easily get to everything from steering cables and sheaves to electrical systems to chainplates. A boat that is easy to maintain gets maintained and is safer at sea. She has a single direct-drive diesel engine housed in her port hull that drives her 8.5 knots burning about 1.25-1.5 gallons hourly. Above 2 knots the engine offset is hardly noticeable at the helm. For marina handling there is a counter-poised Nissan 25 hp outboard mounted on her aft tramp. Did I say Aft Tramp? She has both forward and aft trampolines. The forward tramp is a traditional fixed trampoline made of Sailrite's big boat trampoline material with reinforcing webbing and lashed in place with Amsteel. The aft tramp is Net Systems' 3/4” knotless Dyneema netting strung on an aluminum frame that lowers using the two cockpit primaries and 1/2” Dyneema lines. This makes it very easy to deploy, retrieve, and carry all sorts of water toys, dinghies, and divers. The aft tramp is also a perfect beach for the family and pets when deployed on the hook.

The hulls have huge dry bow lockers forward followed by watertight bulkheads (either bow locker could easily be converted to another crew cabin). The hulls are entered from inward-facing amidships companionways that are almost impossible to flood and provide easy access to the deck and cockpit. On port, you drop down into a cozy galley with a Dickinson diesel-fired oven and cabin heater supplemented by a two-burner propane cook top. There are inboard and outboard counter tops and a double sink fed by both fresh and saltwater foot pumps. There is plenty of built-in cabinetry and even more storage beneath the sole. Aft of the central galley is an elevated dinette with lots of storage below and a custom yew wood table (also from the Olympic forest). Cedar slatted seats are on either side of the table and 6 can be seated comfortably. Forward of the galley is a long double-bunk with cedar-slatted sidewalls.  Hanging lockers are between the bunk and galley and a privacy curtain can be drawn. Aft of the dinette is another watertight bulkhead behind which is the walk-in (OK crouch-in) engine room with a spares and tools compartment. The starboard hull has a long double-berth with hanging lockers forward and another double-berth with hanging lockers aft. Amidships there is a large navigation station and chart table with the charger and house battery bank beneath. A central Newport diesel heater keeps the starboard hull toasty and amidships cabinetry provides plenty of stowage and space. There is a head aft of the second stateroom separated by another watertight bulkhead and accessed through a hatch on deck.

The central cockpit helm is one of my favorite places. Sailing this catamaran is like sailing the world's best sleigh/surfboard. You can easily see all 4 points of the boat. Everything is right at hand and you can feel all of the sensation of wind and water without an intervening salon. The hard dodger provides good protection to the helmsman and the cockpit could easily be enclosed and heated if desired. When standing, the hard dodger top makes the most glorious table for feasting at the helm underway. There is a depth sounder in the cockpit as well as a Lowrance HD5 chartplotter with GPS, fishfinder, and a broadband Lowrance 3G RADAR. The main is sheeted on a central traveler with the ability to both gross and fine tune the main sheet. The main can also be barbered to either of the rails with a block & tackle to make a wonderful downwind 2-part main sheet that maintains great sail shape. The mizzen has two-part sheeting to either stern with the sheets led back alongside the mizzen boom to the mizzen foot and then the cockpit. This makes adjusting the mizzen as simple as turning around in the cockpit. The mizzen sheeting really allows the helmsman to balance out the rig and she goes like she is on rails. Genoa sheets are led to tracks on both housetops and then to the big 2-speed Lewmar 65 primaries. These are massive winches and, though they are intended for the genoa sheets primarily, every running line on the boat can be led to them – even the anchor rodes. In fact, she has no electric windlass. The dual bow anchors have approximately 30' of chain and then 300' of 12-strand nylon rode on each. The rodes can be led to either winch across the UHMW clad beam tops and when retrieved the anchor chain stops just before reaching the winch. It takes about 5 minutes with coffee in the morning to get the anchor up by hand or you can use a winch-bit and electric right-angle drill to bring in anchors or even raise the main.

I love this catamaran, but, like Mr. Farnell, I now find myself with a newly arrived daughter and have made the shift to the dark-side. I've taken up residence on a beautiful Tennant-designed power cat and must sell my beloved Northwest Interpretation of a Polynesian Voyaging Canoe. I've brought her a long way and she is one of the best catamarans I've ever sailed (and I've sailed many). I've had the pleasure of sailing her with Mr. Farnell, John Marples, Jim Brown, Meade Gudgeon, and many others and have benefited from their advice and that of many outstanding marine professionals in her fitting out. Unfortunately, lately she has had light use as I've been busy selling other people's catamarans. Though she's a fun cat in the Northwest and surprisingly cozy in temperate and even inclement weather, she yearns to go to the South Pacific. Who will take her? This is the right cat for a KISS (Keep it Simple (& Strong)) skipper. She will make an excellent low-cost cruising cat for a couple or family. She would also be an excellent mothership for SUPs, surfing, kite boarding, or kayaking adventures offering more than 1000 square feet of deck space (ready for smart harbor awnings). Her price only reflects the cost of the materials that have gone into her. The more than 13,000 hours of labor are free. I am open to interesting offers, trades, real estate and might offer owner financing to a well-qualified buyer.

 

Equipment:

Honda 3kw Generator

Lowrance HD5 Plotter/GPS/Fishfinder

Depth Sounder

ProNautic Charger

4 6-volt batteries in 12-volt house bank (2014)

QuadCycle Battery Monitor

BP Solar Panel

Hasse Main Sail

Genoa Sail w/Roller Furling

Mizzen Sail

2 CQR anchors w/ 30' 5/16" chain and 300' rodes

Isuzu C240 50 HP with 940 Hours

Nissan 25 HP Outboard w/Remote Controls

Bridgedeck Pass-through Hatch

Lowering Aft Trampoline

Assorted Snatch Blocks

Block and Tackles

Boarding Steps

Dickinson Diesel-fired Stove & Oven

Newport Diesel-fired Heater

(2) 3.5-gallon Diesel Heater Day Tanks

Propane 2-Burner Cooktop

Propane Locker

3-part Mast Climbing Rig

Gale-rider Drogue

Steel Bow Shackles for Mooring or Drogue

Teak Bollards

Engine Room Electric Bilge Pump

(2) Whale Gusher Manual Bilge Pumps

Galley Seawater Foot Pump

Galley Freshwater Foot Pump

Marine Head with 40 Gallon Holding Tank

(2) Aluminum Diesel tanks Totaling Approximately 57 Gallons

Mooring Lines & Fenders

Flares

Compass

Fire Extinguishers

Smoke Alarms

CO Detectors

LED Navigation Lights

LED Cabin Lights

Amsteel Lifelines

Disclaimer
The Company offers the details of this vessel in good faith but cannot guarantee or warrant the accuracy of this information nor warrant the condition of the vessel. A buyer should instruct his agents, or his surveyors, to investigate such details as the buyer desires validated. This vessel is offered subject to prior sale, price change, or withdrawal without notice.

Managing Broker

Contact - Matthew Dunning
The Multihull Company

Located in Seattle/Tacoma, WA

OFFICE: 215-508-2704
FAX: 206-347-4091
Email: Matthew@multihullcompany.com
View Matthew Dunning's Profile

Boat Specifications

Year

1990

Length

54 ft

Location

Washington

Price

225,000

Status

Active

Make

Custom Cat - first rigged 2006

Model

Name

Additional Specs

Keel

Engines

About This Boat

She is unlike any other catamaran. She is simple. She is smart. She is old-school cool. I call her my Northwest Interpretation of a Polynesian Voyaging Canoe. I first came across her in early 2000 when anchored in Sequim Bay. She was moored in a protected cove incomplete and never rigged. As I dinghied around her I thought to myself, “That is going to be a sweet catamaran when she is finished - what a cool project.” In 2005 she became my project and I and sentenced myself and a good buddy to 3 Summers of hard boatyard labor and then some great Northwest sailing. . .


Additional Details

History & Specifications

She looks a bit like a Wharram. Indeed, the designer of her hulls (a Mr. Beaubien whom I've never met) had built a 47' Wharram in California in the late 1970s and sailed it for 3 years on the Pacific before selling and determining that he could do better. He did better. He designed very elegant chined hulls that greet the water with ironwood shoed, curved overhanging bows having tremendous reserve buoyancy. He designed elongated transoms that kiss the water goodbye as the last of the 1/2” thick transom-hung rudder departs. These hulls are 54' long overall and hew to the wisdom that there is no substitute for waterline at sea. They are chined to yield ample living space below yet sleek, sleek, sleek. So sleek that she is easily driven at 8.5 knots by her single Isuzu 50 hp diesel. So sleek that she easily achieves 13 knots under sail with 20 knots on the beam. She barely even leaves a wake. Sleek and incredibly durable. She has 15' long mini-keels made of sacrificial laminated cedar with an ironwood shoe and massive skegs protecting her rudders. She will easily stand on her keels and skegs and draws only 3.5'. Her hulls have their stringers on end and filleted in place for strength. Stems are nearly 1 foot thick behind their ironwood cladding. Each hull has a large watertight bow compartment followed by amidships accommodations and then another watertight bulkhead with engine room and head trailing - making 6 watertight compartments overall in the hulls. Her hulls are constructed of epoxy saturated marine plywood (from ¾” to 3/8”) which was then sheathed in fiberglass and West Systems epoxy. Stringers and structural lumber is clear, tight-grained, fir, spruce, and cedar carefully selected from the Olympic forests and supplemented by tropical mahogany, teak, and ironwood. I have never found a knot on her. Her bilges are dry and dusty.

Mr. Beaubien built himself a set of hulls and his friend Mr. Farnell, a cabinetmaker and very good with wood, built a set of hulls as well. Beaubien launched his hulls in the early 1980s. He reportedly joined them with 6 crossbeams entrapping a triple-junk rig and headed North. I hear he is somewhere in Northern BC. I've never been able to find him to tell him that he designed a damn fine set of hulls. Mr. Farnell completed these hulls soon after and, after consultation with multihull designer John Marples, joined them with 4 massive fiberglass-sheathed epoxy-laminated fir box-beams with 3 1/2” top and bottom faces and 1 1/2” side faces plus internal blocking. Each of the 4 box beams are mechanically fastened to the hulls in 4 places using custom brackets and large bronze threaded rod and bolts. The beams are further buttressed on the topsides by large laminated solid mahogany knees and then glassed to the decks and topped with UHMW running boards to prevent damage from chains, lines, or deck gear on top. Each beam is watertight and adds significantly to reserve buoyancy. Everything is prevented from racking by a series of spruce longerons that run beneath the beams and act as the bridgedeck supports.  The longerons carry the bridgedeck more than 3' off of the water (you can drive the dinghy straight beneath and scrub the entirety of the hulls and running gear). A central steering cockpit with a hard dodger is nested amidships.  The cockpit is surrounded by slatted fir removable panels fixed with Amsteel line that make up a strong deck that drains instantly. Mr. Farnell launched the unrigged vessel in 1990 in Port Angeles, WA after more than 10,000 hours of labor and motored her across the Straits a few times before unexpectedly and indefinitely postponing his South Pacific Cruising plans in favor of raising a newly arrived son.

At this point you probably realize this is a broker-owned and broker-loved boat. I bought her from Mr. Farnell in 2005, motored her to Port Townsend and then put another 3,000 man hours and considerable expense into completing her. The first Summer she was stripped to bare wood and/or fiberglass sheathing and inspected throughout before receiving seemingly unending sanding and then 2 layers of 2-part polyurethane primer and 5 layers of rolled and tipped 2-part polyurethane Interlux Perfection topcoat on her hulls. Her decks were 2-part polyurethane primed and then painted with Top-Secret epoxy paints.

That Winter I hired John Marples (now a well respected designer of ply-epoxy cruising and day charter catamarans) to design a rig for her. Even though she is 54' long, I wanted a rig that could be handled easily and simply by a smaller person than myself so John drew a traditional Marconi Ketch rig. You don't see many ketch catamarans, but the rig is an excellent choice for an open-bridge-deck cat. You never need to get within 10' of the water to manage the sails. The mizzen mast is mounted on an aluminum I-beam tressle slung on stainless straps between crossbeams 3 and 4 directly behind the cockpit. The main mast is landed on the 2nd crossbeam ahead of the cockpit. Sails are hoisted from clear decks amidships and all running rigging can be put to the winch either at the mast winches or turned and run to the big Lewmar 65 primary winches in the cockpit. She is very easy to single-hand as all sheets for all 3 sails are right at the helmsman's fingertips in the cockpit. This rigging wizardry was accomplished by Mr. Brion Toss who was hired to install the brand new spars and their standing and running rigging in the Summer of 2006. That Winter Carol Hasse built her a brand new fully-battened mainsail with Strongtrack luff and double reef points and refitted a near-new fully-battened mizzen sail from an Aileron 28' that had only been used for a season's racing. She also added a 130% furling genoa making for a well balanced sail plan that is a delight to sail and beautiful to behold. Sea trials were held with Mr. Farnell aboard on the Strait of Juan de Fuca in the Spring of 2007.

This is a big, simple, strong, and easy-to-maintain and repair catamaran in every respect. Aesthetically, she is more like owning a pair of co-joined Hans Christians than a plastic-fantastic production cat. Simple epoxy, painting, woodworking and mechanical skills are all that are required to keep her in great shape at low expense. You can easily get to everything from steering cables and sheaves to electrical systems to chainplates. A boat that is easy to maintain gets maintained and is safer at sea. She has a single direct-drive diesel engine housed in her port hull that drives her 8.5 knots burning about 1.25-1.5 gallons hourly. Above 2 knots the engine offset is hardly noticeable at the helm. For marina handling there is a counter-poised Nissan 25 hp outboard mounted on her aft tramp. Did I say Aft Tramp? She has both forward and aft trampolines. The forward tramp is a traditional fixed trampoline made of Sailrite's big boat trampoline material with reinforcing webbing and lashed in place with Amsteel. The aft tramp is Net Systems' 3/4” knotless Dyneema netting strung on an aluminum frame that lowers using the two cockpit primaries and 1/2” Dyneema lines. This makes it very easy to deploy, retrieve, and carry all sorts of water toys, dinghies, and divers. The aft tramp is also a perfect beach for the family and pets when deployed on the hook.

The hulls have huge dry bow lockers forward followed by watertight bulkheads (either bow locker could easily be converted to another crew cabin). The hulls are entered from inward-facing amidships companionways that are almost impossible to flood and provide easy access to the deck and cockpit. On port, you drop down into a cozy galley with a Dickinson diesel-fired oven and cabin heater supplemented by a two-burner propane cook top. There are inboard and outboard counter tops and a double sink fed by both fresh and saltwater foot pumps. There is plenty of built-in cabinetry and even more storage beneath the sole. Aft of the central galley is an elevated dinette with lots of storage below and a custom yew wood table (also from the Olympic forest). Cedar slatted seats are on either side of the table and 6 can be seated comfortably. Forward of the galley is a long double-bunk with cedar-slatted sidewalls.  Hanging lockers are between the bunk and galley and a privacy curtain can be drawn. Aft of the dinette is another watertight bulkhead behind which is the walk-in (OK crouch-in) engine room with a spares and tools compartment. The starboard hull has a long double-berth with hanging lockers forward and another double-berth with hanging lockers aft. Amidships there is a large navigation station and chart table with the charger and house battery bank beneath. A central Newport diesel heater keeps the starboard hull toasty and amidships cabinetry provides plenty of stowage and space. There is a head aft of the second stateroom separated by another watertight bulkhead and accessed through a hatch on deck.

The central cockpit helm is one of my favorite places. Sailing this catamaran is like sailing the world's best sleigh/surfboard. You can easily see all 4 points of the boat. Everything is right at hand and you can feel all of the sensation of wind and water without an intervening salon. The hard dodger provides good protection to the helmsman and the cockpit could easily be enclosed and heated if desired. When standing, the hard dodger top makes the most glorious table for feasting at the helm underway. There is a depth sounder in the cockpit as well as a Lowrance HD5 chartplotter with GPS, fishfinder, and a broadband Lowrance 3G RADAR. The main is sheeted on a central traveler with the ability to both gross and fine tune the main sheet. The main can also be barbered to either of the rails with a block & tackle to make a wonderful downwind 2-part main sheet that maintains great sail shape. The mizzen has two-part sheeting to either stern with the sheets led back alongside the mizzen boom to the mizzen foot and then the cockpit. This makes adjusting the mizzen as simple as turning around in the cockpit. The mizzen sheeting really allows the helmsman to balance out the rig and she goes like she is on rails. Genoa sheets are led to tracks on both housetops and then to the big 2-speed Lewmar 65 primaries. These are massive winches and, though they are intended for the genoa sheets primarily, every running line on the boat can be led to them – even the anchor rodes. In fact, she has no electric windlass. The dual bow anchors have approximately 30' of chain and then 300' of 12-strand nylon rode on each. The rodes can be led to either winch across the UHMW clad beam tops and when retrieved the anchor chain stops just before reaching the winch. It takes about 5 minutes with coffee in the morning to get the anchor up by hand or you can use a winch-bit and electric right-angle drill to bring in anchors or even raise the main.

I love this catamaran, but, like Mr. Farnell, I now find myself with a newly arrived daughter and have made the shift to the dark-side. I've taken up residence on a beautiful Tennant-designed power cat and must sell my beloved Northwest Interpretation of a Polynesian Voyaging Canoe. I've brought her a long way and she is one of the best catamarans I've ever sailed (and I've sailed many). I've had the pleasure of sailing her with Mr. Farnell, John Marples, Jim Brown, Meade Gudgeon, and many others and have benefited from their advice and that of many outstanding marine professionals in her fitting out. Unfortunately, lately she has had light use as I've been busy selling other people's catamarans. Though she's a fun cat in the Northwest and surprisingly cozy in temperate and even inclement weather, she yearns to go to the South Pacific. Who will take her? This is the right cat for a KISS (Keep it Simple (& Strong)) skipper. She will make an excellent low-cost cruising cat for a couple or family. She would also be an excellent mothership for SUPs, surfing, kite boarding, or kayaking adventures offering more than 1000 square feet of deck space (ready for smart harbor awnings). Her price only reflects the cost of the materials that have gone into her. The more than 13,000 hours of labor are free. I am open to interesting offers, trades, real estate and might offer owner financing to a well-qualified buyer.

 

Equipment:

Honda 3kw Generator

Lowrance HD5 Plotter/GPS/Fishfinder

Depth Sounder

ProNautic Charger

4 6-volt batteries in 12-volt house bank (2014)

QuadCycle Battery Monitor

BP Solar Panel

Hasse Main Sail

Genoa Sail w/Roller Furling

Mizzen Sail

2 CQR anchors w/ 30' 5/16" chain and 300' rodes

Isuzu C240 50 HP with 940 Hours

Nissan 25 HP Outboard w/Remote Controls

Bridgedeck Pass-through Hatch

Lowering Aft Trampoline

Assorted Snatch Blocks

Block and Tackles

Boarding Steps

Dickinson Diesel-fired Stove & Oven

Newport Diesel-fired Heater

(2) 3.5-gallon Diesel Heater Day Tanks

Propane 2-Burner Cooktop

Propane Locker

3-part Mast Climbing Rig

Gale-rider Drogue

Steel Bow Shackles for Mooring or Drogue

Teak Bollards

Engine Room Electric Bilge Pump

(2) Whale Gusher Manual Bilge Pumps

Galley Seawater Foot Pump

Galley Freshwater Foot Pump

Marine Head with 40 Gallon Holding Tank

(2) Aluminum Diesel tanks Totaling Approximately 57 Gallons

Mooring Lines & Fenders

Flares

Compass

Fire Extinguishers

Smoke Alarms

CO Detectors

LED Navigation Lights

LED Cabin Lights

Amsteel Lifelines

Disclaimer
The Company offers the details of this vessel in good faith but cannot guarantee or warrant the accuracy of this information nor warrant the condition of the vessel. A buyer should instruct his agents, or his surveyors, to investigate such details as the buyer desires validated. This vessel is offered subject to prior sale, price change, or withdrawal without notice.

Inquire About This Boat

Managing Broker

Contact - Matthew Dunning
The Multihull Company

Located in Seattle/Tacoma, WA

OFFICE: 215-508-2704
FAX: 206-347-4091
Email: Matthew@multihullcompany.com
View Matthew Dunning's Profile
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