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Everything ran smoothly with The Multihull Company and we are very pleased with the result. We felt supported and well advised throughout the whole process. Every stage of the purchase (inspection, test sail, survey, rig check etc) was well organised and ran like clockwork.

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Taka Oa

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Fountaine Pajot

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It has been a real pleasure dealing with such an honest and knowledgeable person rather than simply a broker and now someone we truly feel we can call a friend. We will very definitely refer you to any of our friends knowing that you will treat them as fairly and professionally as you have with us.

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Lagoon 410

Hoisting and Lowering Spinnakers

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Hoisting the Spinnaker

“The spinnaker is the best sail of all,” many maintain. It is their secret weapon for light weather and downwind, but one which is increasingly used closer to the wind (especially the asymmetric). Whether it is an asymmetric or a tri-radial, it will be easier to use aboard a multihull than a monohull and, especially in moderate breezes, will allow you to go faster than would be possible with standard sails.

The width of a multihull’s platform means that it is not necessary to use a spinnaker boom, other than the bowsprit, which makes gibing much easier. Unlike an asymmetric spinnaker, the symmetric has two distinct clews, port and starboard, which alternately become the tack, depending on the point of sailing.

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To Launch the spinnaker in its snuffer out of its bag, position it on the trampoline.
Rig a snatch block on each bow, to take the port and starboard guys, which then return aft. To assist trimming, they are extended to the cockpit winches.
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If they are not already in place, install the spinnaker sheets; they return to blocks at the stern; if possible, respect the colors; green to starboard, red to port.

Each guy and sheet end will ideally be equipped with a snap shackle, but a bowline will do the job.
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Before hoisting, don’t forget to secure the ends of the sheets and guys in the cockpit. You can now roll up the jib.
Shackle the halyard to the spinnaker snuffer headboard.
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Hoist the snuffer along with its lines.
Steer on to a more downwind course, so that the main will slightly blanket the spinnaker.
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Pull the snuffer up and the spinnaker inflates.

Now head up slowly to fill the spinnaker.
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Don’t forget to secure the headboard line to stop it flogging. You are sailing with a masthead symmetric spinnaker on port tack; all that is left is to trim the sail.

Dropping the Spinnaker

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Turn slightly downwind to blanket the spinnaker.
The crew member in charge of the snuffer prepares to pull it down, over the spinnaker.
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Now ease the sheet and the spinnaker is no longer drawing.
Pull the snuffer down over the spinnaker.
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One of the crew encircles the snuffer tightly to stop the wind catching it, whilst the other uncleats the halyard. It is advisable to wear gloves, as a fast running halyard can quickly burn the palm of your hand.
The snuffer comes down onto the trampoline.
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Article was taken with permission from the March issue of Multihulls World.

Multihulls World

This article was taken with permission from Multihulls World
Multihulls World is published every other month.

Website: www.multihulls-world.com
Phone: +33 (0)4 92 09 16 18


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Testimonials From Satisfied Customers

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These are stand up people, who make a stand up product. I would buy from them again in a heartbeat.

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~ Jay Clark, Dolphin 460
"Sugar Shack"

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I just wanted you to know that your level of service and the high degree of customer satisfaction have made owning my Dolphin a great experience.

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~ Daniel Zlotnick, Dolphin
"Sugar Shack"

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